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Crimes Involving Peace Officers

Obstructing in Ohio

There are two types of obstructing offenses in Ohio: obstructing official business and obstructing justice. Obstructing official business charges occur when a person does something that interferes with an public official’s ability to perform his job or duties. The most common action that results in an obstructing official business charge is lying to the police.

A charge for obstructing justice is a more involved crime that requires that a person, attempting to prevent the arrest or sentencing of another:

(1) Harbor or conceal the other person or child;

(2) Provide the other person or child with money, transportation, a weapon, a disguise, or other means of avoiding discovery or apprehension;

Obstructing(3) Warn the other person or child of impending discovery or apprehension;

(4) Destroy or conceal physical evidence of the crime or act, or induce any person to withhold testimony or information or to elude legal process summoning the person to testify or supply evidence;

(5) Communicate false information to any person;

(6) Prevent or obstruct any person, by means of force, intimidation, or deception, from performing any act to aid in the discovery, apprehension, or prosecution of the other person or child.

Obstructing charges can range from misdemeanors to felonies depending on the circumstances of the case.

Resisting Arrest

In Ohio, a person can be charged with resisting arrest for knowingly or recklessly by force:

  • resist or interfere with a lawful arrest of the person or another;
  • resist or interfere with a lawful arrest of the person or another person and, during the course of or as a result of the resistance or interference, cause physical harm to a law enforcement officer;
  • No person, recklessly or by force, shall resist or interfere with a lawful arrest of the person or another person if either of the following applies:
      1. The offender, during the course of or as a result of the resistance or interference, recklessly causes physical harm to a law enforcement officer by means of a deadly weapon;
      2. The offender, during the course of the resistance or interference, brandishes a deadly weapon.

    Penalties for Resisting Arrest

    Depending on which of the circumstances listed above applies, resisting arrest can be a first degree misdemeanor, a second degree misdemeanor, or a fourth degree felony.  Click here to view the penalties chart for the maximum amount of jail time and fine associated with each misdemeanor degree.